Concept explained

Here, the pathogenic DNAs are fished by complementary DNA fixed on the bead (sphere). As soon as the binding, DNA drags the electrically neutral bead toward the anode (+ potential) and plugs the nanopore. The block creates a current drop seen in the monitor on the right.  


This concept was proven with $25 Arduino device.  Despite the cost, the detection sensitivity is proven to be equal or better than thousands of dollar machines in clinical laboratories. 

Laboratory processing prototype

What you are seeing is an automated laboratory bench.  This prototype was fabricated Electronucleics Inc.  It is designed to lyse, filter, hybridize, and detect pathogenic DNAs. Normally, these processing steps are done by human operators, but the design allows the machine to replace the manual work. We plan to re-establish the processing protocol with this machine and move toward miniaturization. 

Publications

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Esfandiari, Leyla, Harold G. Monbouquette, and Jacob J. Schmidt. "Sequence-specific nucleic acid detection from binary pore conductance measurement." Journal of the American Chemical Society 134.38 (2012): 15880-15886 

Koo, Bonhye, et al. "Amplification-free, sequence-specific 16S rRNA detection at 1 aM." Lab on a Chip 18.15 (2018): 2291-2299. 

Koo, Bonhye, et al. "Amplification-free, sequence-specific 16S rRNA detection at 1 aM." Lab on a Chip 18.15 (2018): 2291-2299. 

Monbouquette, Harold G., and Jacob J. Schmidt. "Apparatus and method for electrical detection of oligonucleotides through pore blockades." U.S. Patent No. 9,428,806. 30 Aug. 2016. 

Monbouquette, Harold G., and Jacob J. Schmidt. "Apparatus and method for electrical detection of oligonucleotides through pore blockades." U.S. Patent No. 9,428,806. 30 Aug. 2016. 

 Esfandiari, Leyla. PCR-free nucleic acid detector based on nanopore sensing. Diss. UCLA, 2014.